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Arizona Sun Blanket Flower Seeds

(P) Pkt of 25 seeds
Item # 03250-PK-P1
$2.95
Buy 3+ at $2.25 ea
Buy 6+ at $1.95 ea
Available to ship.

Winner of a 2005 All-America Selection AND Europe's highest honor, the Fleuroselect Gold Medal!

A huge breeding breakthrough for Blanket Flowers!
Other Items in this Series:
Arizona Red Shades Blanket Flower Seeds Arizona Apricot Gaillardia x grandiflora Blanket Flower Seeds
2005 All-America Selection

2005 Fleuroselect Gold Medal

This is such an exciting breeding breakthrough for the Blanket Flower family that we hardly know where to begin explaining it! Until now, Blanket Flowers have needed a "vernalization" period to flower -- that is, they had to go through winter temperatures in order to begin the flowering process. Well, 'Arizona Sun' NEEDS NO VERNALIZATION. What this means for us as gardeners is that this plant blooms much, much earlier than other varieties (up to a month!), flowers very heavily even the first year, and sets masses and masses of blooms. As "side benefits," it's also uniform in size and leaf structure. You just won't believe the flower power of 'Arizona Sun' until you see it blooming -- and blooming, and blooming! -- in your garden!

The flowers are large, many-petaled, and lovely. Expect them to reach 4 inches wide and to crowd one another for space on compact plants 12 inches high and 10 to 14 inches wide. They begin blooming in late spring and won't quit until nipped by fall frost! NO wonder 'Arizona Sun' has received top honors on both sides of the Atlantic!

The plant size is uniform, too, which is great for large plantings. And if you've grown other Blanket Flowers from seed, such as 'Goblin', you'll be impressed by the way 'Arizona Sun's foliage looks identical from plant to plant. One of the odd things about Blanket Flowers is that the leaf shape sometimes varies greatly, so that when a large planting is out of bloom, it looks as though it's got 5 or 6 different species instead of just one variety! (We sometimes get calls from folks who have sown their 'Goblin' seeds and come up with wildly different looking plants. Once they bloom they all look alike, but when they're just leaves, you can really spot the differences in foliage shape and texture!) 'Arizona Sun' looks identical from plant to plant, making it suitable even for formal plantings.

Hardy from one end of the country to the other (zones 3-10), this native perennial is happy in any sun-soaked spot. It puts up with heat, humidity, cold, poor soil, and -- once it has built up a good root system in your garden -- drought. The flowers are lovely for cutting, and they make nice garden companions to other sun-loving natives, especially the newcomer in the Arizona family, beautiful 'Red Shades,' which reaches the same size and blooms at the same time as 'Arizona Sun.' Other great companions include Coreopsis, Echinacea, and Yarrow.

Starting 'Arizona Sun' from seed is easy. Sow indoors or out, germinating at 70 to 75 degrees F and leaving the seeds uncovered. They will sprout within 5 to 10 days, and (if begun indoors) can be transplanted anytime after the seedlings have 2 sets of true leaves. (The first "leaves," actually cotyledons, will shrivel and fall off when the seedling is young.) 'Arizona Sun' will begin blooming 12 to 15 weeks after sowing -- unheard-of for a Blanket Flower and pretty quick for any perennial! Zones 3-10. Pkt is 25 seeds.

Genus Gaillardia
Species x grandiflora
Variety 'Arizona Sun'
Item Form (P) Pkt of 25 seeds
Zone 3 - 10
Bloom Season Late Spring - Late Fall
Habit Upright
Seeds Per Pack 25
Plant Height 12 in
Additional Characteristics Butterfly Lovers, Easy Care Plants, Flower, Long Bloomers, Repeat Bloomer
Bloom Color Dark Yellow, Orange
Bloom Season Fall, Summer, Winter
Foliage Color Medium Green
Light Requirements Full Sun
Moisture Requirements Moist,  well-drained
Resistance Cold Hardy, Deer Resistance, Disease Resistant, Drought Tolerant, Heat Tolerant
Season Of Interest Summer
Soil Tolerance Normal,  loamy, Sandy
Uses Beds, Border, Containers, Cut Flowers, Ornamental, Outdoor
Overall Rating: 5 Stars
Average Based on 2 Reviews Write a Review
Compact Plant with Lots of Bright Blooms
David K from SC wrote (May 17, 2012):
I grew these from seed last year and have them planted in full sun with little supplemental watering in the hot, humid Southeast and am pleased with the results. The plants are short and compact for blanket flowers, and bloom prolifically starting in late April here. They are a great addition for the front of my planting beds.
In zone 9A it virtually dies in the summer
Judy from FL wrote (January 04, 2012):
I think that it is a little too hot and humid for this plant. The base of the plant rots. Great flowers September thru June. Tolerated Floridas couple of freezes and continues blooming. The yellow (which is no longer available) isn't affected by the summer heat and humidity.
Coreopsis is the botanical name for Tickseed
Coreopsis Germination Information

Coreopsis Seed Germination How to Sow Coreopsis:
  • Sow outdoors anytime from early spring through summer up to two months before frost or in late fall for germination the following spring
  • Seeds can also be sow indoors
  • Barely cover C. grandiflora seed and maintain a temperature within the medium of 55° F
  • Leave C. rosea uncovered and maintain 68-86° F
  • When sowing seed outdoors, we recommend a maximum planting depth of 4X the width of the seed

How to Grow Coreopsis:
Spacing:
  • C. grandiflora: Space 12 inches apart in full sun and a light, sandy, well-drained soil
  • C. rosea: Space 18 inches apart in full sun in moist to dry soil

Soil: Keep plants moderately moist and remove faded blooms to extend the flowering period. Little fertilizer is needed

Appearance and Use:

An easy-to-grow perennial for growing in masses or in meadows, urban environments, or naturalized areas. Also, ideal for container growth. C. grandiflora has basilmounds of lobed, dark green foliage, 16-36 inches tall and 12 inches wide, with showy, 2- to 3- inch, single or double blooms of yellow from summer to fall. C. grandiflora is excellent to grow in combinations of red, white, blue, or purple flowers such as Veronica, Monarda, Salvia, or Gaillardia

C. rosea has rounded plants 18-24 inches tall and 24 inches wide with needlelike foliage and 1- inch pink blooms with from July to September


About Coreopsis:
Pronunciation:  kôr-e-op’-sis
Lifecycle:  Perennial
Origination: Compositae; C. grandiflora is native to the midwestern and southern U.S. and C. rosea to the central U.S.
Common Name:Tickseed

Which plants should I grow to repel insects?

Many of the herbs will repel insects. Pennyroyal repels fleas and other insects. Pyrethrum repels moths, flies, ants, mosquitoes, cockroaches, mites, and bedbugs. Mint repels flies, fleas, and ants. Lavender repels flies, silverfish, and fleas. Catnip can repel mosquitoes. Thyme repels insects. Lemon Grass repels mosquitoes. Basil repels flies and mosquitoes. Sage repels a variety of insects. Chrysanthemum, grown for its beautiful flowers and for the extraction of pyrethrin (an organic insecticide), repels flies, beetles, mosquitoes, roaches, lice, and fleas.

Which plants should I grow to repel rabbits and deer?

Planting garlic, onions, chives, lavender, rosemary, and sage around rabbit-susceptible plants will repel rabbits. Deer repellent plants include: lavender, onion, catnip, sage, chives, garlic, spearmint, and thyme. Be sure to strategically place these repellent plants around and in between rabbit and deer-susceptible plants. Also, place some along the property line and especially at key points the rabbits and deer are using as entryways, which can even deter them from coming onto your property.

Which of your plants offered are deer resistant?

Perennials that are deer resistant include: Asclepias, Aster, Baptisia, Coreopsis, Dianthus, Digitalis, Echinacea, Gaillardia, Heuchera, Hibiscus, Malva, Monarda, Oriental Poppy, Platycodon, Peony, Rudbeckia, Salvia, Sedum, and Tricyrtis. Shrubs include: Buddleia, Buxus, Cotoneaster, Daphne, Forsythia, Fothergilla, Hibiscus (Rose of Sharon), Potentilla, Spiraea, Syringa, and Viburnum. Vines include: Clematis, Honeysuckle, Campsis, Wisteria, and Climbing Hydrangea. Trees include: Acer (Maple), Cercis (Redbud), Corylus, Fagus (Beech), Magnolia, Ginkgo, Mulberry, Spruce, and Salix (Willow).

Does Park sell GMO's or treated seeds?

It is important for our customers to know that Park Seed does not sell GMO or treated seed. We do buy a small amount of traditional hybrid seed from Seminis, a division of Monsanto Co., but that is all we purchase from them.

What are the differences between organic, heirloom, and hybrid seed?

Basically, organic seeds are seeds that are produced without the use and exposure to artificial/chemical fertilizers, insecticides, fungicides, herbicides, and other chemicals. They have to be grown, harvested, stored, and handled under very strict organic rules and procedures. All of our organic seeds are USDA 100% certified organic through Clemson University and the certificate has to be renewed yearly.

Heirloom Seeds are open-pollinated -- they are not hybrids. You can gather and save heirloom seed from year to year and they will grow true to type every year, so they can be passed down through generations. To be considered an heirloom, a variety would have to be at least from the 1940's and 3 generations old (many varieties are much older -- some 100 years or more!).

Hybrid seed are the product of cross-pollination between 2 different parent plants, resulting in a new plant/seed that is different from the parents. Unlike Heirloom seed, hybrid seed need to be re-purchased new every year (and not saved). They usually will not grow true to type if you save them, but will revert to one of the parents they were crossed with and most likely look/taste different in some way.

What are pelleted seeds? Why do you use them? How do I handle/sow them?

Extremely small seed such as Petunias and Pentas are shipped as pelleted seed to make them easier to handle and sow. Pelleted seed are coated, usually with clay, to make them larger in size. After sowing, the coating will dissolve when wet and the seed will germinate. Pelleted seeds are shipped in vials placed inside seed packets, which protects them from being crushed. When sowing, be certain to use thoroughly moistened soil, to be sure that the clay coating absorbs enough moisture to dissolve. For sowing pelleted Petunia seeds, place the seeds directly on the soil surface and do not cover with soil, as light aids in the germination.

What is ideal temperature to germinate most seeds?

The ideal temperature to germinate most seeds is approximately 70 degrees F; give or take 1-2 degrees either way. This would be a good germination temperature for most flower and vegetable seeds and would be the most practical and feasible temperatures achieved for gardeners starting seeds in the home. You will notice for some seeds that it is recommended to use alternating day (warmer), night (cooler), temperatures, which is fine if one can provide such conditions. But most people are unable to provide those temperatures in a home setting, so just use the overall 70 degree F recommendation and the seeds should germinate well.

How long should grow lights be kept on per day and how close to the plants should the light be kept?

For germination and seedling/plant growth, you want to simulate the natural day-night cycles, and as a general rule, grow lights should be on 8-12 hours per day and off at night. You can vary this timing, as some seeds such as tomato, pepper, petunia, impatiens, and others, benefit from 14-17 hours of light per day (and the remainder of the 24 hour period in darkness). The most common grow lights used are fluorescent; using cool white, warm white, and wide-spectrum fluorescent tubes. These lights work well for germination and for growing plants up to a transplantable size. Fluorescent lights should be kept close though, 3-6 inches above the soil or the growing plants, adjusting the height as the plants grow.

How long will seeds keep in storage?

Park Seed stores seed in a special temperature- and humidity-controlled storage facility, which keeps seeds in excellent condition. Our seeds should be good for at least 1-2 years on average. Seed viability and storage time will vary depending on the seed item; some will keep a shorter time and some will keep longer. Seeds should be stored in a cool, dark, dry place. A basement will do (if not too humid), or a cool, dark room or closet. We recommend the best way to extend seed storage life is to store them in something air tight, such as a plastic zipper storage bag or canning jar, and place it in the refrigerator. This will extend the life of seeds for many years.

What is the best way to store seeds over a longer time period?

We recommend the best way to extend seed storage life is to store seeds in something air tight, such as a plastic zipper storage bag or canning jar, and place it in the refrigerator. This will extend the life of seeds for many years.

What depth should I sow various seeds?

When sowing seed outdoors, we recommend a maximum planting depth of 4X the width of the seed. When sowing seed indoors, the planting depth can be less, depending on the seed being sown, so it is always best to check specific directions. Here are some general guidelines concerning planting depth in relation to seed size: Tiny, dust-like seeds need to be sown on the surface of the growing medium or soil, uncovered, as they need light to germinate. The planting depth for small seed can be anywhere from barely covering, to 1/8-inch deep, to possibly 1/4-inch deep, depending on the recommendation. Medium seed should be planted at 1/4- to 1/2-inch deep, depending on the recommendation. Larger seeds can be planted 1-inch or deeper, depending on the recommendation.