Avalon Triplesweet™ Hybrid Corn Seeds

Avalon Triplesweet™ Hybrid Corn Seeds

High-quality 8-inch ears have tight husks and great staying power!


(P) Pkt of 200 seeds
Item # 05097-PK-P1
Available to ship.
$3.95
(M) 1/4 lb
Item # 05097-PK-M
Available to ship.
$12.95
(N) 1/2 lb
Item # 05097-PK-N
Available to ship.
$24.95
(L) 1 lb
Item # 05097-PK-L
Available to ship.
$39.95
82 days. Crunchy-sweet flavor like you have never tasted before bursts from these plump 8-inch ears! One of an entirely new type of corn called Triplesweet™, Avalon Hybrid combines the crunchy texture of sugary-enhanced types with the extra sweetness and great holding ability of the supersweets! The result? Delicious!

Triplesweet™ corn actually contains TWO kernel types, selected and reselected to create an ear that is 75% sugary-enhanced and 25% supersweet. Ideal for home gardens, it needs no isolation from other corn and has great staying power on the stalk.

Avalon Hybrid boasts high-quality white ears, each jammed with 16 to 18 rows of white kernels beneath tight green husks (which keep the harvest fresh and pest free). They are both attractive and scrumptious, with a full-bodied flavor so savory you may find yourself eating them straight from the stalk! And they keep so well that you don't have to harvest them all at once! Taste, texture, and hold -- that's the Triplesweet™ advantage! Pkt is 200 seeds.

Corn is one of the most versatile and best-loved veggies you can grow. It's been cultivated for thousands of years, increasing in popularity over time, as its attributes have become more and more obvious. Not only is it delicious in a wide variety of dishes as well as fresh from the stalk, but its uses go well beyond the culinary world. From Corn-on-the-cob and popcorn to syrups and cereals and an abundance of other products (edible and not!), this tasty vegetable is truly remarkable!


Choosing a Variety

When choosing what type of Corn to grow, you'll be able to pick from white, yellow, and bicolor varieties as well as consider a number of other traits that affect taste and tenderness. Here's a list of different hybrid varieties and their main characteristics:

Regular Sweet Hybrids -- Traditional, old-fashioned Corn flavor, delicious without an emphasis on sweetness. High yielding.
Sugar Enhanced Varieties -- Sweeter than regular strains, and with a sweetness that lasts longer after the Corn has been picked. A creamy, tender texture and no planting isolation needed from other Sweet Corn.
Super Sweet Varieties -- Bred for twice the sweetness of regular Corn. Will hold their tenderness and sweetness up to two weeks. They must be planted in totally warm soil and kept isolated from other types by 200 feet or 14 days planting time.
New Triple Sweet Varieties -- Wonderfully sweet, but they were bred to add more original Corn taste to the sweetness, improve crunchy texture, and hold their flavor and sweetness even longer. Requires no isolation from other Sweet Corns.


When to Start

Corn is best sown outdoors in situ after all danger of frost has past in spring. Sow in warm soil -- optimum temperature is at least 60 degrees F. Sweet Corn can be started indoors 2 weeks before the last frost at a temperature of 70 to 75 degrees F, but direct sowing is recommended.


How to Start

If you want a continuous crop, sow every two weeks until early spring. Sow at a depth of 4 times the size of the seed in rows that are 24 to 36 inches apart. Plant in full sun in a rich, moist, well-drained soil. Once the seedlings appear, thin them to 3 to 12 inches apart. If you have started them inside and are transplanting them, do so when they have at least two sets of true leaves and allow them the same amount of space as previously mentioned. Expect germination in 7 to 10 days.


Special Considerations

Cross-pollination can occur between different varieties of Corn, affecting taste, color, and other qualities. To prevent this, isolate each type by at least 700 feet, or allow at least 14 days between times of maturity.

Do not plant sooner than 10 days to 2 weeks after the date of the last killing frost. If you plant too early, your seedlings may die or their growth can be delayed.

Since Corn is wind pollinated, it's better to plant 4 or more short, side-by-side rows than 1 or 2 long rows. This will help pollination and ear development.


Growing Tips

  • Side dress your Corn plants with a high-nitrogen fertilizer.
  • Harvest your Sweet Corn once the silks have dried -- this will be approximately 3 weeks after silking.
  • Harvesting: break the stem of the ear (shank) close to the ear. Avoid breaking the main stock or tearing the stem from the stalk. Just hold the ear near the base and bend it down sharply. You can also bend it to the side.
  • You can expect at least one ear (sometimes more) from each stalk.
  • In order to maintain the sugar content you will want to refrigerate your Sweet Corn right away.

Pests and Problems to Watch For

  • Corn borer -- This moth's larvae feeds on all above-ground tissues of the plant. The cavities they produce interfere with the translocation of water and nutrients, thus reducing the strength of both the stalk and the ear shank. Some methods of control include using a pest-resistant variety, destroying infected stalks at the end of the season, and harvesting early before the moths have a chance to lay eggs.
  • Corn earworm -- These caterpillars feed on the tips of the ears of Corn, devouring the kernels and sometimes even destroying the silks before pollination has completed. This results in deformed ears that are susceptible to disease and mold. They can be controlled with Bt, a natural bacteria that produces toxic proteins that kill certain insects. You can also till in fall and spring to expose pupae to wind, weather, and predators, release beneficial insects such as trichogramma wasps, lacewings, minute pirate bugs, and damsel bugs, or use botanical insecticides (always read instructions and cautions before use).
  • Smut -- Corn smut is caused by a fungus, and it can be removed by hand and buried or burned. Since the spores can get into your Corn through injured parts of the plant, try to avoid injury of roots, stalks, and leaves during cultivation. Also, plant disease-resistant varieties when possible, and at the end of the season, plow diseased stalks to bury any surviving spores.
  • Stewart's disease (bacterial wilt) -- This disease is caused by a bacteria that's transmitted by several insects, namely the flea beetle, which will over winter and spread the disease once it starts feeding on the new year's crop. To control it, plant disease-resistant plants whenever possible, eliminate or discourage the presence of flea beetles, and don't use seeds that were produced in a field contaminated with Stewart's wilt.
  • Flea beetle - Flea beetles, so named for their tendency to jump when disturbed, love Corn. They produce a characteristic injury to leaves known as "shot-holing." Young plants and seedlings are particularly susceptible to this damage. You can use SevinĀ® Dust or organic Neem oil to control them.

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Bulk Vegetable Seed: Best Varieties, Best Value!
If you are fortunate enough to grow a large vegetable patch, participate in a neighborhood or community garden, or work a farm, Park's bulk vegetable seed is the perfect product at a terrific price! We've taken some of our most popular and delicious varieties and packaged them in larger quantities. And what we save in sorting, storing, and packaging expenses, we pass along to you! So choose your favorites and best wishes for a productive and tasty harvest this season!

Note: These seed counts are estimates. The actual number of seeds per ounce/pound may vary slightly.

  Corn Beans Peas     Beets Onions
(P) Pkt * 200 100 160   (P) Pkt * 200 200
(M) 1/4 lb 575 275 375   (G) 1/4 oz 450 2000
(N) 1/2 lb 1150 550 750   (H) 1/2 oz 900 4000
(L) 1 lb 2300 1100 1500   (J) 1 oz 1800 8000
(R) 2 lbs 4600 2200 3000   (K) 2 oz 3600 16000
(S) 5 lbs 11500 5500 7500        

* A few varieties may have a different (P) Pkt seed count than the quantity listed; check the specific variety's description for the number of seeds per pkt.

The ancient Native American technique of growing Corn, Beans, and Squash together in an arrangement called the Three Sisters is the ultimate in companion planting and helps increase harvests, naturally!

Corn acts as a support for climbing bean vines, the beans fix nitrogen in the soil for the high feeding requirements of corn and squash, and the squash provides mulch and root protection for the corn and beans! After cooperating beautifully in the garden, corn and beans form a complete protein when eaten together! How's that for a mutually beneficial relationship?

The Three Sisters are all easy to direct sow in the garden and are a great project for children, teaching them about the beauty of natural harmony while providing a fast-growing reward for their efforts.

Make the best possible use of your garden space this season, and try growing the Three Sisters! Just follow the easy steps listed below, fertilize well, plant other companions like herbs to assist with pest control, and you'll be harvesting your best crop in no time!

In May or June when soil has warmed:

Shape a flat-topped circular mound of soil about a foot high and 2 feet across at the top, sloping outward toward the base. Plant a circle of corn seeds on top, about 5 or 6, and water them in well, tamping down your soil mound firmly so it doesn't wash away in the first rain. Space the mounds 3 or 4 feet apart in the garden.

Since all corn grows on sturdy, dependable stalks, the variety you choose depends on the flavor, disease resistance, and holding ability you want. Sugar Buns is a Sugar Enhanced (SE) yellow hybrid with absolutely scrumptious golden kernels and is positively scrumptious. For SE whites, you can't beat Silver Princess, with extra-long ears bursting with flavor. And for the sweetest ears yet, you absolutely must try Corn Mirai, available in Yellow, White, Bicolor, and even a Mini!

About two weeks later:

When your corn reaches about 5 or 6 inches high, plant Bean seeds (6 to 8 of them) around the edges of the flat top or about halfway down the sloping sides of the circular mound. Push the seeds down deep into the soil and, if you're planting on the slope, make sure the soil is nice and firm. Add a bit of Nature's Aid at planting time to help the Beans fix nitrogen.

To get your Beans to climb up the cornstalks, choose Pole rather than Bush varieties. Smeraldo is far and away the best-tasting Pole Bean, with flat pods up to 10 inches long on vigorous 4- to 6-foot vines. Park gardeners rave about Kwintus, a super-early performer with succulent pods on stringless 8- to 10-inch pods. And is the classic name in Beans, with top-quality dark green pods that are both stringless and fiberless, even if you pick them a bit late. We even have Blue Lake available in organic seed!

One week or so after that:

Plant Squash seeds around the base of the mound, on flat ground. You can make them radiate around the mound, or just go in the direction you have available space! 6 to 8 seeds in a ring around the base of the mound is usually plenty.

The traditional Squash family member for this Sister is Pumpkin, with its all-American flavor and long growing season. For a quicker harvest, grow Summer Squash varieties such as organic Early Summer Crookneck or Zucchini such as space-saving Eight Ball Hybrid.

When everything begins growing...

Thin the plantings to 2 or 3 Corn stalks, each with no more than 2 Bean plants winding around it. (You'll need to help the Beans get started growing up the stalks). The Squash is going to vine along the ground, so the number of plants you need depends on how far apart your mounds of corn and beans are, how long the vines get, and how much walking space you need in the garden.

Add a FOURTH sister: Sunflowers!

Sunflowers attract birds, thus tempting them away from your corn plants. They shade the vining bean plants while also adding support. Plus, they're beautiful! It's a win-win situation!

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