Attention Customers: Our customer service center is closing today, Tuesday January 28, 2014, at 4:30pm due to inclement weather conditions.
Labor Day Sale
New For Fall
Seed Sale
Beats All Others to the Finish!

Candid Charm Hybrid Cauliflower Seeds

(P) Pkt of 25 seeds
Item # 05113-PK-P1
$1.75
Buy 3+ at $1.25 ea
Available to ship.

Huge yields and all-around excellent performance -- you just can't go wrong with Candid Charm!

Thick wrapper leaves offer great protection, keeping these heads flavorful and tight.
65 days from transplanting seedlings. Always the first to harvest, this highly adaptable, ultra-productive Cauliflower is the best all-around variety we've ever grown. Whether you're looking for huge yields, healthy plants, or a quick finish, Candid Charm's got it!

These flavorful heads are kept particularly tight, fresh, and delicious by very thick wrapper leaves, which keep the white beaded flesh protected from the elements as well as nibbling pests. Quite dense, the heads give you an extra bite or two of delectable goodness, because you waste so little!

Candid Charm is very well-adapted from north to south, so no matter what your climate, you can rely on big yields and trouble-free growth. If you're a first-time Cauliflower cultivator, this is the variety to begin with! And if you're an old hand at vegetable growing, you'll be impressed by Candid Charm's all-around superior performance.

Cauliflower is a cool-season crop suitable for spring and fall cultivation. For spring, sow seeds indoors 5 to 7 weeks before setting out as soon as the soil is workable. For fall, begin seeds in late summer. Set the seedlings 18 inches apart in the garden. Pkt is 25 seeds.

Genus Brassica
Species oleracea
Variety Candid Charm Hybrid
Item Form (P) Pkt of 25 seeds
Days To Maturity 65
Fruit Color White
Seeds Per Pack 25
Additional Characteristics Cool Season, Easy Care Plants, Edible
Harvest Season Early Fall, Early Summer, Late Fall, Late Spring, Mid Fall
Light Requirements Full Sun
Moisture Requirements Moist,  well-drained
Soil Tolerance Normal,  loamy
Uses Cuisine, Outdoor

If you want vegetables that are loaded with vitamins and nutrients as well as delicious flavors and beautiful, eye-catching colors, look no further than our numerous varieties of Broccoli and Cauliflower! These really are“super-veggies”, packing a healthy punch in every scrumptious bite, offering heavy yields so you'll have plenty of fresh produce for every meal, and proving hardy and versatile enough to satisfy everyone!


Choosing a Variety

All Broccoli and Cauliflower are packed with vitamins and nutrients, so when choosing what varieties to grow, you'll base your decision mostly on size and color. There are several compact types that don't require a lot of space, so they're the best choice for a limited gardening area. Heat tolerance is also a factor, especially for those living in the south. And if you're wanting to get your children to eat more healthy veggies, you might want to look at the more colorful, fun varieties!


When to Start

Broccoli seeds are best started indoors 7 to 9 weeks before the last frost, at a temperature of 70 to 75 degrees F. They can also be sown outdoors 2 weeks before the last frost. For a winter crop in zones 8 and warmer, sow in late summer. Expect germination in 10 to 14 days.

The same guidelines apply to Cauliflower, except when starting indoors, sow your seeds 5 to 7 weeks before the last frost. Expect germination in 8 to 10 days.

Since Cauliflower is more sensitive to cold than its cabbage-family relatives, you need to start it early enough that it has a chance to mature before the heat of the summer. Be careful, however, not to start it so early it gets damaged by the cold.


How to Start

Sow your Broccoli and Cauliflower seeds at a depth of 4 times the size of the seed, or ½ inch deep, and water thoroughly. Once the seeds have sprouted, be sure to keep the soil lightly moist.

Make sure the plants receive plenty of light -- fluorescent light for around 14 to 16 hours a day is also ideal for the fastest growth. You will want to keep the seedlings just a few inches below the light so they don't“stretch”and get“leggy". If you don't have fluorescent lighting, a south-facing window will do just fine.

Broccoli -- 45 to 60 days from sowing to harvesting

Cauliflower -- 30 to 80 days from sowing to harvesting


Planting Out

Transplant your Broccoli and Cauliflower seedlings when they have at least two sets of true leaves. This should be done about 2 weeks before the last frost. Site them in full sun in a rich, moist, well-drained soil, spacing the young plants 18 to 24 inches apart in rows that are 2½ to 3 feet apart. Feed both your Broccoli and Cauliflower with a low nitrogen fertilizer when first planting out. For your Broccoli, fertilize again when the plants are 6 to 8 inches tall, 12 to 15 inches tall, and then when the buds first form. For your Cauliflower, fertilize again every 4 weeks. Keep the seedlings well watered and mulched to retain moisture and keep the roots cool.


Special Considerations

If your seedlings have been held too long or mistreated in some way before planting, they can create“buttons”, or small heads, that tend to flower prematurely.

Climatic elements such as extreme cold and drought can cause your plants to halt their full growth and form only “buttons”.

Don't allow your transplants to get too mature before moving them to your garden. If you do, they may become stressed by transplant shock.

A starter fertilizer applied when you transplant your seedlings will get your Broccoli and Cauliflower off to a good start, but it will not compensate for all the possible problems just mentioned.

Beets, Onions, and Garlic are all good companions for your Broccoli and Cauliflower.


Growing Tips

  • Broccoli -- once the head is fully developed, but before the individual flowers start to open, cut the central head along with 5 or 6 inches of stem. Removing the central head will stimulate development of the side shoots, which will allow you to continue your harvest for several weeks.
  • Cauliflower -- the heads (curds) develop quickly under proper conditions, typically growing to 6 to 8 inches within 7 to 12 days after branching begins. Harvest the mature heads (they should be compact and firm) by cutting the main stem. If the heads develop a coarse,“ricey”appearance, they have over-matured. Cauliflower does not typically have side shoots, so you can compost the plants after the heads have been harvested.
  • Store fresh, unwashed Broccoli in your refrigerator's vegetable crisper for 3 to 5 days. Put it in a loose or perforated plastic bad, being sure not to store it if it's wet -- wet Broccoli will quickly become limp and can get moldy. Its best flavor and nutritional value will be maintained if storage is brief.
  • Uncooked Cauliflower can be stored in a paper or plastic bag in the refrigerator for up to a week. Place it stem side down to keep moisture from collecting in the florets.

Pests and Problems to Watch For

  • Aphids are often found on the underside of leaves. You can wash them off with a strong stream of water or use an insecticidal soap (be sure to follow the label instructions). Check the plants regularly, as aphids can be a recurring problem.
  • Cabbage worms tend to attack the leaves and heads of related cole crops. Cole crops are crops that belong to the mustard family and have similar cultural requirements. They're hardy plants that prefer cool weather. The most commonly grown cole crops are Broccoli, Cauliflower, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage, Kale, Collards, and Kohlrabi.
  • There are three species of cabbage worms -- imported cabbage worms, cabbage loopers, and diamond back moth worms. They're very destructive to plants, as they have a voracious appetite. Covering the plants with screening or a row cover can prevent the presence of these pests.

View All Know Before You Grow Topics

Brassica is the botanical name for Ornamental Cabbage and Kale
Brassica Germination Information

Brassica Seed Germination How to Sow Brassica:
  • Sow indoors, covering the seeds with 4X their thickness in soil
  • Maintain the temperature of 68°-70° F during germination
  • Germination takes takes 3-10 days
  • For early spring color, sow in late winter
  • When sowing seed outdoors, we recommend a maximum planting depth of 4X the width of the seed

How to Grow Brassica:
Space:  Space seedlings 12 inches apart in rich, well-drained soil and full sun

Soil: Keep the soil evenly moist and fertilize moderately

Temperature: Thrives in 60° F nights and tolerates deep shade

Transplanting and additional care:  It is easy to transplant and shows the best color if fertilizer is withheld during the last month of production and is grown cool (60°F). In zones 8-10, discourage weeds and protect the roots in winter

Appearance and Use:

Decorative, ornamental plants for beds, borders, and edging. Brassica is beautiful in containers. Ornamental Kale can also be eaten or used as a garnish.Plants display thick green leaves held in rosettes 12 inches across with centers of white, rose, or purple in fall and winter


About Brassica:
Pronunciation:  bras’i-cå o-ler-a’se-a
Lifecycle:  Ornamental Kale
Origination: Brassicaceae; native to Europe
Common Names: Ornamental Cabbage and Kale

Superior Germination Through Superior Science

Park's Superior Seeds Park Seed's humidity- and temperature-controlled seed storage vault Park Seed offers some of the highest-quality vegetable and flower seeds available in the industry, and there are a number of reasons for this.

First of all, we have humidity- and temperature-controlled storage, and we never treat any of our seeds with chemicals or pesticides. Nor do we ever sell GMO's (genetically modified seeds), so you always know the products you're buying from us are natural as well as safe for you and the environment.

Superior Standards - University Inspected

Testing seeds against minimum germination standards To make sure we are providing the best seed product possible and that our customers will get the highest number of seedlings from every packet, we conduct our own germination testing and have quality-control measures in every stage of our seed-handling operation. We hold ourselves to standards that are at or above federal and state standards, including testing specific crops more frequently than recommended by federal guidelines. And in order to maintain our organic certification, we welcome Clemson University to inspect us annually to make sure our organic seeds, which are stored and processed separately, are being handled properly.

Hand Packed By Experienced Technicians

Park Seed has been handling and packing vegetable and flower seeds for 145 years, a history that has given us a great understanding of how each variety should be cared for and maintained throughout every step of theprocess, from collection to shipping.

When packing our seeds, the majority are actually done by hand (with extreme care!), and we often over-pack them, so you're receiving more than the stated quantity.

The Park Seed Gold Standard

Park Seed's exclusive Fresh-Pak gold foil seed packets And many of our seeds are packed in our exclusive Fresh-Pak gold foil packets, which are lined to keep moisture out, so the seeds stay fresher for longer. We carefully pack very tiny or fragile seeds in crush-proof vials to ensure safe delivery to your home. Some of the small seeds are also offered as "pellets" (have a clay coating) to make sowing and growing easier.

When it comes to the kinds of seeds we offer, we are constantly seeking something new and provide many unique and hard-to-find varieties from all around the world. Our on-staff horticulturists are ready and available to share their expertise to help you with the success of these seeds, so you can grow a beautiful and productive garden!

Does Park sell GMO's or treated seeds?

It is important for our customers to know that Park Seed does not sell GMO or treated seed. We do buy a small amount of traditional hybrid seed from Seminis, a division of Monsanto Co., but that is all we purchase from them.

What are the differences between organic, heirloom, and hybrid seed?

Basically, organic seeds are seeds that are produced without the use and exposure to artificial/chemical fertilizers, insecticides, fungicides, herbicides, and other chemicals. They have to be grown, harvested, stored, and handled under very strict organic rules and procedures. All of our organic seeds are USDA 100% certified organic through Clemson University and the certificate has to be renewed yearly.

Heirloom Seeds are open-pollinated -- they are not hybrids. You can gather and save heirloom seed from year to year and they will grow true to type every year, so they can be passed down through generations. To be considered an heirloom, a variety would have to be at least from the 1940's and 3 generations old (many varieties are much older -- some 100 years or more!).

Hybrid seed are the product of cross-pollination between 2 different parent plants, resulting in a new plant/seed that is different from the parents. Unlike Heirloom seed, hybrid seed need to be re-purchased new every year (and not saved). They usually will not grow true to type if you save them, but will revert to one of the parents they were crossed with and most likely look/taste different in some way.

What are pelleted seeds? Why do you use them? How do I handle/sow them?

Extremely small seed such as Petunias and Pentas are shipped as pelleted seed to make them easier to handle and sow. Pelleted seed are coated, usually with clay, to make them larger in size. After sowing, the coating will dissolve when wet and the seed will germinate. Pelleted seeds are shipped in vials placed inside seed packets, which protects them from being crushed. When sowing, be certain to use thoroughly moistened soil, to be sure that the clay coating absorbs enough moisture to dissolve. For sowing pelleted Petunia seeds, place the seeds directly on the soil surface and do not cover with soil, as light aids in the germination.

What is ideal temperature to germinate most seeds?

The ideal temperature to germinate most seeds is approximately 70 degrees F; give or take 1-2 degrees either way. This would be a good germination temperature for most flower and vegetable seeds and would be the most practical and feasible temperatures achieved for gardeners starting seeds in the home. You will notice for some seeds that it is recommended to use alternating day (warmer), night (cooler), temperatures, which is fine if one can provide such conditions. But most people are unable to provide those temperatures in a home setting, so just use the overall 70 degree F recommendation and the seeds should germinate well.

How long should grow lights be kept on per day and how close to the plants should the light be kept?

For germination and seedling/plant growth, you want to simulate the natural day-night cycles, and as a general rule, grow lights should be on 8-12 hours per day and off at night. You can vary this timing, as some seeds such as tomato, pepper, petunia, impatiens, and others, benefit from 14-17 hours of light per day (and the remainder of the 24 hour period in darkness). The most common grow lights used are fluorescent; using cool white, warm white, and wide-spectrum fluorescent tubes. These lights work well for germination and for growing plants up to a transplantable size. Fluorescent lights should be kept close though, 3-6 inches above the soil or the growing plants, adjusting the height as the plants grow.

How long will seeds keep in storage?

Park Seed stores seed in a special temperature- and humidity-controlled storage facility, which keeps seeds in excellent condition. Our seeds should be good for at least 1-2 years on average. Seed viability and storage time will vary depending on the seed item; some will keep a shorter time and some will keep longer. Seeds should be stored in a cool, dark, dry place. A basement will do (if not too humid), or a cool, dark room or closet. We recommend the best way to extend seed storage life is to store them in something air tight, such as a plastic zipper storage bag or canning jar, and place it in the refrigerator. This will extend the life of seeds for many years.

What is the best way to store seeds over a longer time period?

We recommend the best way to extend seed storage life is to store seeds in something air tight, such as a plastic zipper storage bag or canning jar, and place it in the refrigerator. This will extend the life of seeds for many years.

What depth should I sow various seeds?

When sowing seed outdoors, we recommend a maximum planting depth of 4X the width of the seed. When sowing seed indoors, the planting depth can be less, depending on the seed being sown, so it is always best to check specific directions. Here are some general guidelines concerning planting depth in relation to seed size: Tiny, dust-like seeds need to be sown on the surface of the growing medium or soil, uncovered, as they need light to germinate. The planting depth for small seed can be anywhere from barely covering, to 1/8-inch deep, to possibly 1/4-inch deep, depending on the recommendation. Medium seed should be planted at 1/4- to 1/2-inch deep, depending on the recommendation. Larger seeds can be planted 1-inch or deeper, depending on the recommendation.