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Rainbow Blend Heirloom Tomato Plant
The Best Heirloom Mix Ever!

Rainbow Blend Heirloom Tomato Plant

Now Shipping to All Zones
Item # 87717-PK-6D
$12.95
Buy 2+ at $11.95
Item is sold out.

All indeterminate and all bearing large, distinctive, delicious fruit!

Contains Aunt Ruby's German Green, Dixie Golden Giant, Black from Tula, Brandywine Red, Big Rainbow, and Cherokee Purple.
Note: Six packs contain a combination of six varieties, not all six packs will contain all of the varieties listed.

This is simply the best mix of heirloom varieties I've ever seen! You get 6 truly unusual and interesting varieties, all distinctively different, for one low price! If you love the fascinating forms and rich, full flavor of heirloom Tomatoes, this is the mix you MUST grow!

Aunt Ruby's German Green (85-90 days) is a large beefsteak on indeterminate vines. When fully ripe it will be a light green color with a tint of yellow and a faint pink blush. The fruit is 12 to 16 ounces, very sweet and spicy with a succulent bite like no other.

Big Rainbow (80-102 days) is an indeterminate variety hailing from Pol County, Minnesota. The 6-foot plants sport enormous, heavily ribbed fruits of gold with streaks of red, not only on the skin but right through the flesh, too, for terrific plate appeal. These gigantic Tomatoes weigh in at up to 2 pounds apiece! You know they're ripe when the stem end is deep gold and the blossom end bright red! The largest of the fruits are subject to cat-facing and cracking, but the flavor is so incredible, it's worth it!

Black from Tula (75-85 days) is a Russian variety with an indeterminate habit and the largest black Tomatoes ever grown. These fruits are 4 to 5 inches in diameter and slightly flattened (8 to 12 ounces on average). They're actually deep mahogany-brown to purple, often with green shoulders. The rich, smoky flavor of this Tomato is amazing! And the plants set fruit well in hot weather, making them a great choice for the south and southwest. Rare!

Brandywine Red (80-100 days) is a large indeterminate variety on potato leaf vines. The fruit can weigh up to 2 pounds and is a deep, rich red when ripe. Brandywine is one of the best known of the heirlooms, and one bite will tell you why -- the flavor is incredible!

Cherokee Purple (80-100 days) is an indeterminate variety with rather short vines. The fruit is slightly flattened, about 10 to 12 ounces, and colored a purple-brown-pink combination with green gel until it ripens. Full of old-fashioned "real tomato" flavor!

Dixie Golden Giant (85-100 days) is a very mild Tomato superb for slicing. Fruits can get up to 2 or even 2 1/2 pounds on very vigorous vines. The color is a rich golden-yellow at maturity, and the flavor is quite sweet. An Amish family has been growing this variety since the 1930s!

Garden Fresh Express Shipping at No Extra Charge
When it's time for your plants to make their journey from our greenhouses to your doorstep, we take no chances with their health. Every plant receives Express (2-day) shipping at the more economical standard shipping rates, so that it arrives promptly, without enduring delays along the way.
Genus Lycopersicon
Species esculentum
Variety Tomato Heirloom Rainbow Blend
TomatoFruitSet Indeterminate
FruitColor Black
Habit Upright
FruitWeight 8
AdditionalCharacteristics Edible, Heirloom
LightRequirements Full Sun
MoistureRequirements Moist,  well-drained
SoilTolerance Normal,  loamy
Uses Cuisine, Outdoor
Restrictions Canada, Guam, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, Virgin Islands

The variety of Tomato you decide to grow depends on where you live. If your growing season is short, as it is in the far north, you will want to choose an early variety to ensure yourself the best harvest. Early season Tomatoes ripen quickly, typically being ready to pick within 4 months of sowing the seeds.


Choosing a Variety

If you live in the deep south or another warm-climate area with humid summer nights, you'll want to grow varieties that are heat tolerant and resistant to blossom drop. Whatever your location, you'll need to grow your plants where they can receive at least 6 hours of full sunlight a day.

You will also need to consider when you want to harvest -- all at once or gradually over the season. If you enjoy canning the fruit, a determinate variety is your best choice. These plants grow as a 3- to 4-foot-tall bush and set all their fruit within a few weeks. If you want to enjoy your Tomatoes throughout the season, choose an indeterminate variety, which grows as a vine and needs staking. And for a little of both, consider the new semi-determinate varieties such as Sweet 'n' Neat Scarlet Improved and Orange Paruche. These plants stay small enough to grow in containers, yet keep bearing all season long!


When to Start

Tomatoes are best started indoors. This needs to be done 5 to 7 weeks before the last anticipated frost date. The seedlings can then be transplanted into your garden anywhere from 2 to 4 weeks after the last actual frost date. Call your County Extension Office to get frost information for your area.


How to Start

Park's Bio Dome seed starter is a great way to sow Tomato seeds, because each Bio Sponge has a pre-drilled hole you just drop one seed into -- no need to thin seedlings, no wasting of seeds! You can use either the original 60-cell Bio Dome, or our 18-cell Jumbo Bio Dome, which grows big, stocky seedlings ready to transplant right into your garden.

Place your Bio Dome in a 70- to 75-degree room, or just use a seedling heat mat to raise the temperature in the dome. You should see the first sprouts in 3 to 8 days. As soon as your sprouts are up, place the seedlings under strong light.

If you're using a potting mix, sow at a depth of 4 times the size of the seed. You can also use our convenient Jiffy Pots and Strips -- Jiffy Pots are constructed entirely of lightweight, sturdy peat moss, so as the roots develop, they eventually grow right through the Jiffy Pot wall and into the garden soil!

Fluorescent light for around 14 to 16 hours a day is ideal for fastest growth. Keep your seedlings just a few inches below the light so they don't "stretch" and get "leggy." If you don't have strong artificial light, a sunny window will work, too -- just keep the clear dome on your Bio Dome to protect your seedlings from those chilly drafts!


Planting Out

About 2 weeks before your transplant date work the garden soil thoroughly, adding generous amounts of compost and about 4 pounds of fertilizer (5-10-10 is ideal) for every 100 square feet. Then cover the soil with a tarp or plastic mulch to keep the weeds from sprouting until you're ready to plant.

Ten days before transplanting, you'll need to start "hardening off" your young plants by setting them outdoors in a lightly shaded area for an hour or two. The next day, give them a longer visit outside until they remain outdoors overnight, still in their pots. Naturally, if a cold spell hits, bring them indoors again to wait for the temperature to rise.

When planting, bury the stem almost up to the lowest set of leaves, even if this means covering up several extra inches. If your plants have a long, tall, spindly stem with leaves widely spaced, you can plant them horizontally in the ground right up to the first set of leaves -- the plant will root all along its stem. Just dig a long trench a few inches below the soil, lay the plant carefully into it as if you're burying it, and then gently angle the stem upwards, so that the only part showing is the very top, with at least 4 to 6 leaves aboveground. Strip the underground leaves off the plant and cover up the entire length of "leggy" stem. Be careful not to bend the stem so sharply that it breaks -- bank it with soil and pat the earth down firmly around it.

As soon as your Tomatoes are in the ground, mulch heavily around the plants to keep weeds down and moisture in the soil. If you're growing the plants in straight rows, plastic mulch is far easier and effective than loose mulch (such as straw or pine bark).

The amount of space you need to keep between Tomato plants depends on the type you're growing:

  • Determinate and compact indeterminate -- 2 feet apart
  • Indeterminate grown on stakes -- 18 inches apart
  • Indeterminate grown in cages -- 3 feet apart
  • Container varieties -- 2-gallon pot


Special Considerations

If you can keep from doing so, don't plant your Tomatoes where peppers, eggplants, or Tomatoes were planted the previous year. These veggies all belong to the same plant family and therefore have similar nutritional needs and are susceptible to similar diseases. Their presence one year can deplete soil of important nutrients and possibly leave remnants of diseases in leaf litter.

Do not over-fertilize your Tomatoes, as this can make the plants less likely to flower. Your best bet is to use a formulation created specifically for Tomatoes like Tomato AlgoFlash.

Use Kozy Coats to protect your plants from frost -- they use water and sunlight to keep the air around your plants a few degrees higher.


Growing Tips

  • Prepare your soil in the fall. Lay in a foot or more of bio-degradable mulch -- chopped-up leaves, grass clippings, pine bark, decayed vegetable compost, humus, and even newspaper all break down into the soil over time. This feeds the soil just what it likes so that when you approach it with a tiller or shovel in spring, it just needs to be turned over and mixed up a bit. Then top off the whole rich pile with a piece of plastic to keep the mulch "cooking" as long as possible into winter and to prevent all the good nutrients from running off in hard rains.
  • If frost still threatens after you plant your Tomatoes, or if you live in a short-season climate where late frosts are just part of spring, there are ways to keep your Tomatoes going. One way is to place a tarp over the plants, weighing it down at the edges to keep it from blowing away. Be careful, however, not to lay the tarp or plastic directly on the plants. You will need to use blocks, sticks, or whatever you have available to form a tent over your tender young Tomatoes. You can uncover it during the day and re-cover it at night, or leave it in place for several days and nights without damage to the plants.
  • Once the fruit sets, be sure to keep the plants evenly watered until they're nearly ripe. The rule of thumb is an inch and a half a week, but if you begin the season watering more heavily, keep up the same rate. Just before the fruit ripens, taper off a bit. This will make the flavor meatier and less watery.
  • Pick your Tomatoes when they are full, red, and firm. Eat them fresh off the vine or store them at about 60 degrees F. If you find yourself frantically picking the last several dozen while they're still green (to avoid an early autumn frost, for example), wrap them loosely in newspaper or a brown paper bag and store them in a cool, dark, dry place. Or count your blessings and fry them up at once!

Pests and Problems to Watch For

Nematodes live in the soil and destroy Tomato plants from the roots. You can use chemicals to control these pests, but the easiest and most beautiful way to kill them is to plant Marigold Golden Guardian along with your Tomatoes. This lovely annual naturally eliminates these destructive parasites.

Cutworms are caterpillars that chew through the stems of Tomato plants. They can be conquered by putting a Cutworm Shield around each plant at transplant time, or you can make your own from coffee cans, plastic drink bottles with both ends cut out, or cardboard paper towel and toilet paper rolls. Sink the shield at least an inch beneath the soil as well as several inches above it.

Pests or diseases can cause holes or spots on your leaves. The most likely pest culprit is the hornworm, which you can hand pick off your plants and dispose of as you see fit.

Blossom drop occurs when you have lots of flowers but no fruit. Anything from high humidity to unseasonable cold could cause this to happen. The plants must be pollinated to set fruit -- you can help get the pollen up and moving by shaking the plant to loosen it up a bit.

If your Tomatoes have a mark or dark scar at one end, that's Blossom-end Rot, and it's probably caused by a calcium deficiency or a sudden change in temperature during fruit set. All you need to do is cut off the affected part and enjoy the rest of the Tomato. If it's marked all over, that's called Cat-facing, and it's probably a result of transplanting too early, insufficient water, or unusually high temperatures. Again, just cut away the scarred area.

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Superior Quality - Hand Grown To Perfection!

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Each plant is grown to perfection and ready to take off in your garden or in your best containers; they are the absolute best quality annuals anywhere. Our wide selection includes high quality heirloom tomatoes, compact patio vegetables, exclusive combination plantings, trailing Petunias, Calibrachoas, flowering vines, and foliage plants




Exclusive Growing Media Produces Vigorous Growth

Our special blend creates the ideal density and balance of pH levels for best root development and water retention. This encourages quicker rooting, better branching, and more vigorous growth. gives them the head start they need to grow their best!

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Our greenhouses offer state-of-the-art environmental controls to ensure the health and vitality of your plants. Each plant is hand-grown and inspected by industry professionals. We’ve been growing superior plants for many decades, and we treat each with care. Regular monitoring and good old-fashioned attention to detail make Park plants far better cared for than the mass-produced trays you might find elsewhere.

Delivered in Biodegradable Elle Pots

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Our 6-packs of annual plants are grown in biodegradable Elle Pots. These fabric sleeves allow air, water, and even plant roots to penetrate. The result is terrific aeration, less soil compaction, and superior root growth. Plants grown from cuttings in Elle Pots establish much more quickly, stay healthier during growth and shipping, and transplant easily into your garden or container. Each Elle Pot is approximately 2 inches long, 2 ½ inches wide, and 3 inches deep. When you order a 6-pack, you receive six Elle Pots in a unit 7 inches long, 5 inches wide, and 3 inches deep.

Garden Fresh Express Shipping at No Extra Charge

When it’s time for your plants to make their journey from our greenhouses to your doorstep, we take no chances with their health. Every plant receives Express (2-day) shipping at the more economical standard shipping rates, so that it arrives promptly, without enduring delays along the way.

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Mother Nature offers no guarantees, but we at Park Seed sure do! Here is our unequivocal guarantee and how to use it. All Park Seed products are guaranteed to be high quality, true to type, shipped properly, and to perform as advertised. If you plant has received our recommended care and doesn’t perform to your satisfaction, notify us and we will replace it free of charge or provide the cost of the product as credit toward a future purchase. If any plant was damaged in shipping, please notify us immediately at 800-845-3369.

If any annual plant does not meet your standards, contact us at 800-845-3369 within 14 days of receipt. It’s that simple.