Muskmelon/Honeydew Germination Information

Muskmelon/Honeydew Seed Germination How to Sow Muskmelon/Honeydew:

  • In areas with a long, hot growing season seeds are best sown outdoors after all danger of frost is past in the spring and when the ground is warm
  • Seeds can also be sown indoors 3-4 weeks before night temperatures remain above 55°
  • Sow at 72-75° and in individual pots as they resent being transplanted
  • Indoors and out, sow at a depth of 4 times the size of the seeds and expect germination in 7-10 days

How to Grow Muskmelon/Honeydew:
Transplanting: Transplant when there are at least two sets of true leaves

Spacing: Space 18 inches apart in rows spaced 4 feet apart or grow on hills containing 3 plants per hill with hills spaced 4-6 feet apart

Soil:  Site in full sun in a light, rich, sandy, well-drained soil

Additional Care: Keep well watered while plants are growing; keep on the dry side as fruit is ripening to improve sweetness and flavor. Excess moisture during the 3 weeks prior to harvest gives melons a bland, watery taste. Mulch with black plastic to conserve moisture, eliminate weeds, and speed harvesting. Fertilize prior to planting and again every 4 weeks. Some varieties are early maturing, making it possible to grow them where the growing season is short

Appearance and Use:

This vine sprawls 8-10 feet along the ground and bears Muskmelon (what is incorrectly called Cantaloupe—a fruit that is not grown in the United States) and Honeydew Melon. Muskmelon (Reticulatus Group) is round or oval, the skin is ribbed and net-patterned, and the flesh is orange or musky. Honeydew (Inodorus Group) is round, smooth-skinned, and with a light green flesh. Harvest Muskmelon when the stem slips easily from the fruit with a slight pressure; harvest Honeydew when the skin turns pale yellow or tan (the stem may not slip easily)


About Muskmelon/Honeydew:
Botanical name: Cucumis melo
Pronunciation:  ku’ku-mis me’lo
Lifecycle:  Annual
Origination: Cucurbitaceae; native to western Africa