Caroline Raspberry Plant

Caroline Raspberry Plant

The largest fruit, with a full-bodied, rich flavor.


Pack of 3
Item # 41324-PK-3

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Plant Patent #10,412. Caroline Raspberry is plentiful in rewards while needing little work to get them. Known for consistently delivering bushels of flavorful scarlet berries, this ever-bearing, self-pollinating bush will begin producing in June and keep the berries coming right until the nip of winter. Growing up to 4ft tall this raspberry plant is resistant to disease and very adaptable to climates all across the US. Make a home for Caroline in a sunny spot with well-drained soil to get the maximum yield of plump, delicious berries. Capture the spirit of summer with Caroline Raspberry! Zones 4-10.

Raspberries like full sun and good air circulation. They do best in enriched garden soil that is moisture retentive but well-drained. Plant about 3 feet apart in the row, or train up a trellis. Plant about 1 inch deep in heavy soils, 2 inches in loose, sandy soils. For best growth, cut back immediately after planting, to prevent the plant from setting fruit the first year. This will give you much stronger growth and better harvests in years to come. Water well during growth, and consider mulching to conserve water until the following spring, when the mulch should be removed to let the plants warm up.

Review Summary
(Based on 1 Reviews)

Overall Rating: 5.0 / 5.0

Reviews

Grows well
Mark from SC wrote on March 04, 2017

Wanted Raspberry plants that would survive South Carolina heat and I found them! First year gave just a few berries but came back with a vengeance the next season- now I have 2 15 ft rows of plants all from the first set of 3 just 2 years later. They are everbearing so be prepared for weeks of moderate harvests, but no one period of overwhelming production. Very good fruit for cereal, baking or just enjoying, I have planted in partial shade and they do very well.

Raspberries
How many years before fruiting plants bear their first crop?
For fruiting plants such as blueberry, raspberry, blackberry, fig, honeyberry, cranberry, and grape, it takes 2 years to bear the first crop. That does not mean you may not get some fruit before then. Depending on the size and maturity of the plant shipped, you may get at least a few pieces of fruit or a small quantity produced the first year. But, by the second year, you should have your first real crop of fruit to enjoy and fruit production will increase every year thereafter.